Music Conferences for Sync Licensing

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This post is for songwriters and music producers who are into sync licensing and wondering which music conferences they should prioritize.

3 Top Music Conferences for Sync Licensing

I’m not going to give you a long list of music conferences, just 3 that are particularly helpful if you’re trying to get your music on TV.

1- TAXI Road Rally

The TAXI Road Rally takes place in Los Angeles every year in early November.

It’s pretty much entirely focused on sync licensing so it’s perfect if you’re trying to get music licensing placements and want to learn a bit more about how the industry works.

Pro tip: TAXI members get two free tickets to attend.

2- Sync Summit

You can attend a Sync Summit in New York, Los Angeles or Nashville.

Each Sync Summit has a vast array of panels where you can hear from music industry experts that share their day-to-day job.

This is helpful to understand and identify their pain points….

Every job has their downsides. Maybe there’s a downside you can exploit to stand out from the crowd.

Pro tip: Sync Summit also host online events “where you can ask questions and learn how decision makers find and use music”.

3- Midem

The Midem music conferences takes place in Cannes every year in France, 2-3 weeks after the prestigious film festival.

If you’re based in Europe and/or planning beautiful sunny vacations, the Midem is the place for you!

It’s an incredibly well-respected music industry event.

The focus is a little bit broader than the TAXI Road Rally and Sync Summit but there’s still plenty of information and feedback opportunities for music composers that are looking to work in TV, film and games.

Pro tip: make sure you attend the panels on branding and positioning. These will help when you’re pitching your songs to music supervisors and/or music publishers.

What Do You Do BEFORE You Get There?

Whenever you attend a music business event, it’s important that you come prepared to make the most of it.

Be clear about why you’re there and who you want to meet

What are you trying to accomplish? Who might be able to help you with that?

What kind of panels might be interesting for you?

Look at the program in advance and actually make these decisions, commit to 2-3 things you will absolutely get done during the music conference.

No excuses. No shying away from the challenge 😉

Be clear about what you’re selling

No one has the time to hear you rambling on about your music and life story.

Make sure you have a short elevator pitch that doesn’t say anything like: “I write in lots of different genres”.

Be concise but specific.

If you need more help with this, you can take inspiration from the cold emails to music supervisors checklist that I put together for a previous post.

What Do You Do Once You’re There?

Music conferences can be a bit pricey, especially once you factor in travel and accommodation for those coming in from out of town.

In order to stand out….

Focus on THEM, not you

Music Conferences - Make sure you keep your ears open
Make sure you keep your ears open to what other people have to say at music conferences.

Listen before you talk.

Listen MORE than you talk.

That doesn’t mean you should lie in the shadows and miss out on every opportunity to pitch your music to industry experts BUT….

Make sure you’re focusing on THEM, your customers, the music supervisors and other key decision-makers.

Look For Information That’s Relevant To YOU

If you can attend, make sure you make the most of it and pay particular attention to:

  • pitching & feedback panels (try to participate if you can!)
  • any panel where you have a professional telling you how they choose and, perhaps most importantly, reject music submissions.

Turn That Information Into Action

Every step of the way, ask yourself questions like:

  • what does this mean for me and my music?
  • who makes the decision to choose music in this or that situation?
  • what makes them tick? how may I grab their attention? what should I avoid?
  • how can I make their lives easier?
  • is there something about their job that they don’t like? can I help them with that?

With the answers to these questions, you can put together a really mean action plan!

Conclusion

If you attend music conferences with a clear game plan, a catchy elevator pitch and the determination to HELP someone with your music, you’ll do well.

And if you can’t make it to a music conference this year, try to turn that to your advantage!

You have lots of other networking options to promote your music….

In fact, you can really stand out from the crowd if you avoid networking mistake #2 and look into other industry events relevant to your project, not just music conferences.

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2018-10-30T23:26:44+00:00

2 Comments

  1. VeePo November 3, 2018 at 9:30 pm - Reply

    Thanks, Joyce. Your posts always seem to keep me from wandering too far from my intended path – get placements! 😉

    • Joyce Kettering November 4, 2018 at 1:15 pm - Reply

      Good! Stay on track! 😀

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